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LETTERS TO EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 347-349

Justifying the inclusion of structured integrated teaching in competency-based curriculum to bridge the lacunae in traditional curriculum


1 Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission20-May-2020
Date of Decision16-Jun-2020
Date of Acceptance30-Jun-2020
Date of Web Publication19-Oct-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpaet District - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cmi.cmi_84_20

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Justifying the inclusion of structured integrated teaching in competency-based curriculum to bridge the lacunae in traditional curriculum. Curr Med Issues 2020;18:347-9

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Justifying the inclusion of structured integrated teaching in competency-based curriculum to bridge the lacunae in traditional curriculum. Curr Med Issues [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Nov 26];18:347-9. Available from: https://www.cmijournal.org/text.asp?2020/18/4/347/298601




  Introduction Top


The traditional medical education is characterized by the delivery of curriculum in a subject-specific model, with each individual subject being compartmentalized from other.[1] This accounted for imparting knowledge in a fragmented manner, which in turn never allowed medical students to become a competent graduate (in terms of acquisition of clinical reasoning, critical thinking, communication, etc.) and take care of the patients as a whole. Further, this kind of disjointed curriculum delivery encouraged the repetition of the same topic multiple number of times by different subjects, which not only lead to time wastage, but even confused students to some extent because of the same thing being offered by different teachers. The ultimate outcome was that students failed to apply their knowledge into clinical practice.[1],[2],[3] Even though, integrated teaching was adopted as a curriculum enrichment initiative in some of the medical colleges even in the traditional curriculum, but it was irregular and there was no specific pattern to avoid duplication or impart knowledge and skills to the students.[2],[3]


  Inclusion of Structured Integrated Teaching Top


Acknowledging all these facts, in the recently proposed competency-based curriculum for undergraduates, the concept of integrated teaching has been given due emphasis in the form of conduction of both horizontal and vertical integrated teaching session across different phases to aid the medical students to become a holistic and competent graduate.[2],[3],[4] In general, integrated teaching aims for the organization of the teaching content in an interrelated manner across different subjects, which bridges the gap prevailing between the imparted medical knowledge and the clinical practice.[1],[3]


  Proposed Norms Top


With reference to the Graduate Medical Education Regulations 2019, it was proposed that temporal coordination will be the main mode for delivery of the four-fifth of the medical curriculum, while the remaining share of the total curriculum will be covered by sharing and correlation through an integrated session. It has been emphasized that the primary aim of all the sessions should be to accomplish the phase-based objectives, while the subjects from other phases should be used only to make the students understand about the clinical application of the topic.[4] Moreover, we have to understand that conduction of an integrated teaching session does not mean that we have to involve multiple teachers while taking each class, instead they should be involved in lesson planning. Finally, the topics which cannot be aligned and integrated should be delivered in a standalone manner over the entire course of the year.[4]


  Merits of Integrated Teaching Top


A number of advantages has been attributed to integrated teaching as it aids in accomplishing positive educational outcomes through the promotion of better understanding- retention and application of concepts, and improved decision-making, critical thinking and problem-solving skills.[1],[2],[3] Further, it helps the students to synthesize knowledge beyond the subject boundaries, promotes cooperative learning, and motivates students toward learning by meeting the varied needs of students with different learning styles.[5],[6],[7] Moreover, as the teaching gives an exposure to real life problems through an integrated and multidisciplinary approach, the students are mutually benefited.[1]

It won't be wrong to say that integrated teaching is the need of the hour in medical education, as there is not enough time available to teach every aspect in isolation.[1],[2] Furthermore, the level of collaboration among different department and different faculty members significantly increases.[2],[3] However, the important challenge is formulation of schedule for integration between different departments without overdoing it and sticking to the proposed plan for the benefit of students.[7] In addition, the delivery of curriculum in integration sessions should happen using different innovative teaching–learning methods such as problem-based learning or team-based learning or case-based learning.[2],[3],[4],[5],[6]

In Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, a constituent unit of Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Puducherry, the approach of organ-system has been adopted for implementation of integrated teaching. All the topics which can be aligned from the subjects of Anatomy, Physiology, and Biochemistry have been temporally aligned and specific time has also been given to cover the stand-alone topics, especially from Biochemistry. However, to ensure its seamless implementation, all the faculty members of the department did the ground work for almost 6–9 months in collaboration with the Medical Education Unit and the sister college. The preparedness activities include sensitization of the faculty members about the new curriculum, teaching-learning methods, assessment methods, development of specific learning objectives for each of the subject-specific competencies, and time-tabling. Even after the implementation of the curriculum, we have been quite flexible in making any modifications to meet the needs of the students and benefits them.


  Conclusion Top


Adoption of integrated teaching within the purview of delivering medical curriculum has to be encouraged across all the medical colleges as it is bound to significantly impact the process of the development of an Indian Medical Graduate.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Status and the gray areas linked to integrated teaching in medical education in India. Int J Acad Med 2019;5:194-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Vashe A, Devi V, Rao R, Abraham RR, Pallath V, Umakanth S. Using an integrated teaching approach to facilitate student achievement of the learning outcomes in a preclinical medical curriculum in India. Adv Physiol Educ 2019;43:522-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Ambwani S, Vegada B, Sidhu R, Charan J. Impact of integrated teaching sessions for comprehensive learning and rational pharmacotherapeutics for medical undergraduates. Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2017;7:S57-S61.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Medical Council of India. Competency Based Undergraduate Curriculum for the Indian Medical Graduate; 2019. Available from: https://www.mciindia.org/CMS/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/UG-Curriculum-Vol-I.pdf. [Last accessed on 2020 Jun 17].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Critiquing the component of integrated teaching proposed under the new Graduate Medical Regulations 2018. Med J DY Patil Vidyapeeth 2019;12:93-4.  Back to cited text no. 5
  [Full text]  
6.
Yadav PP, Chaudhary M, Patel J, Shah A, Kantharia ND. Effectiveness of integrated teaching module in pharmacology among medical undergraduates. Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2016;6:215-9.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Salha A, Saberi-Movahed AS, Waqar S. Medical student perspectives on integrated teaching within medical school. Adv Med Educ Pract 2018;9:753-6.  Back to cited text no. 7
    




 

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Introduction
Inclusion of Str...
Proposed Norms
Merits of Integr...
Conclusion
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