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MEDICAL EDUCATION
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 60-61

Scope of feedforward in medical education and the role of teachers


1 Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission30-Oct-2020
Date of Decision05-Nov-2020
Date of Acceptance17-Nov-2020
Date of Web Publication13-Jan-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
FAIMER, PGDHHM, DHRM, FCS, ACME, Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) - Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cmi.cmi_139_20

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Scope of feedforward in medical education and the role of teachers. Curr Med Issues 2021;19:60-1

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Scope of feedforward in medical education and the role of teachers. Curr Med Issues [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Apr 20];19:60-1. Available from: https://www.cmijournal.org/text.asp?2021/19/1/60/306938



Feedback in medical education has been identified as one of the strongest approaches to motivate students, promote deep learning, enable active engagement, and ensure better application of the learned knowledge in clinical practice.[1] In general, feedback gives emphasis on the current performance of the student and informs the student about what was done well and the areas which need further attention.

Even though feedback is important, we have to simultaneously give equal importance to feedforward, wherein the aim is to develop a shared action plan for ameliorating the performance of the student with an intention to produce competent doctors who can meet the health-care needs of the society.[1],[2] As the name itself suggests, feedforward looks in future and is a mode to provide constructive feedback to the students to improve their performance.[2] In other words, through feedforward, a teacher can provide information to the student about what they should perform differently in the future. The given suggestions are directed toward improving the current performance of the students.[1],[2] It has been extensively employed in fields like management, cognitive, and behavioral science to enhance the outcome.

The feedforward can be offered either in a negative (viz. the teacher gives corrective remarks about the performance of the students in subsequent assessments and thus what all behaviors should be avoided) or in a positive (viz. the teacher supports those behaviors of the students which needs to be repeated in subsequent assessments) manner.[1],[2] The technique of feedforward is derived from the principles of appreciative inquiry and helps all the persons who are involved in the process.[2]

Teachers have an indispensable role in improving the outcome of feedforward and benefitting the student to the maximum extent.[2],[3] It is expected that a teacher should reinforce all those aspects which are working well in favor of the student by sharing the same with the student. The teacher has to appreciate both the intention as well as the execution so that students understand the reason and can inculcate those behaviors for their future career.[1],[3] Similar to all the sports, it is expected that a teacher should focus their energy toward improving the performance of students in future assessments or clinical interactions and not criticize the current performance.[2],[3],[4] We have to acknowledge the fact that students perform well or imbibe the desired skills once they are motivated and feel positive about themselves. In other words, teachers should change their outlook toward the mistakes done by students and instead consider those as opportunities for improving the performance of students in the future.[3],[4]

The technique of feedforward can be employed even in groups, wherein one of the participants opts for one behavior that they want to change as it would make a significant change in their life. Subsequently, the other participants are asked to suggest any two suggestions, which the person can do to ensure that they are able to achieve that change in the future. All the participants have to listen silently each other's views without giving them any feedback and the process continues till all the participants are covered in a similar way.[1],[2],[3] It would not be wrong to document that feedforward encourages creativity and imagination and gives a sense of self-belief that the student belongs to the field and can play an important role in improving their learning skills or the delivery of health-care services.[2]

The technique of feedforward in the delivery of medical education helps the medical students to envision a positive future and eventually helps them to learn to be better. Moreover, under ideal circumstances, a combination of both feedback and feedforward will account for a developmental impact on learning after each assessment.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Role of feedback in the feed-forward of undergraduate medical students. Res Dev Med Educ 2018;7:62-3.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Ghazal L, Aijaz A, Parpio Y, Tharani A, Gul RB. Feed-forward: Paving ways for students' subsequent learning. Nurse Educ Today 2018;71:116-20.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Bing-You R, Hayes V, Varaklis K, Trowbridge R, Kemp H, McKelvy D. Feedback for learners in medical education: What is known? A scoping review. Acad Med 2017;92:1346-54.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Armson H, Lockyer JM, Zetkulic M, Könings KD, Sargeant J. Identifying coaching skills to improve feedback use in postgraduate medical education. Med Educ 2019;53:477-93.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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